ArtShine

The Twelve Healthy Fruits Of Christmas

The ArtSHINE project is not only about coaching our clients. Here at ArtSHINE we’re also very much committed to a Healthy LifeStyle too.

One of the early stages in our coaching programme is where we encourage our clients to set at least one personal goal around a Healthy LifeStyle.

Today ‘s post we share with you the twelve Healthy Fruits of Christmas.

“The Healthy Fruits… and nothing but the Fruit”~ ArtSHINE

So what is your favourite fruit for this hot summer or  Cold Winter?

Here we are giving you some information about the twelve fruits we selected for this Christmas 2013.

strawberry

1. Strawberry

Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 23 calories, 1.5 g fibre, source of vitamin C

Disease-fighting factor: Strawberries are rich in several antioxidants that have anti-inflammatory properties, including helping to prevent atherosclerosis (hardened arteries) and to suppress the progression of cancerous tumours.

• Did you know?

The flavour and colour of strawberries is enhanced by balsamic vinegar. For a fabulous dessert, drizzle balsamic vinegar over ripe strawberries and serve with vanilla ice cream.

Watermelon Benefits for Health

2. Watermelon

• Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 23 calories, less than 1 g fibre, source of vitamin A

Disease-fighting factor: Watermelon is 92 per cent water, making it aptly named. It’s a great addition to any weight-loss diet because it is low in calories and satisfies the sweet tooth.

• Did you know?

Watermelon rinds and seeds are both edible. Roasted, seasoned seeds make a great snack food, and the juicy rind can be stir-fried, stewed, or pickled.

Cantaloup

3. Cantaloupe

Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 25 calories, less than 1 g fibre, source of vitamin A, folate and potassium

Disease-fighting factor: Cantaloupe is high in the antioxidant beta-carotene, which may help reduce the risk of developing cataracts. Cantaloupe is a perfect diet food since it has about half the calories of most other fruits.

Did you know?

Since bacteria can grow on the outside rind, it is important to wash cantaloupe before cutting into it.

cranberry

4. Cranberry

• Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 25 calories, 2.5 g fibre, rich in antioxidants

Disease-fighting factor: Cranberries are antibacterial and studies show that they can help treat and prevent urinary tract infections. Recent research has also linked cranberries to the prevention of kidney stones and ulcers.

Did you know?

Unsweetened cranberry juice makes an excellent mouthwash – studies show it can help kill bacteria and fight cavities.

blackberries --- Image by © Murtin/photocuisine/Corbis

5. Blackberry

Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 31 calories, 4 g fibre, rich in antioxidants

• Disease-fighting factor: Blackberries get their deep purple colour from the powerful antioxidant anthocyanin, which may help reduce the risk of stroke and cancer. Studies show that blackberry extract may help stop the growth of lung cancer cells.

• Did you know?

The ancient Greeks called blackberries “gout-berries” and used them to treat gout-related symptoms.

Rasoberry

6. Raspberry

Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 32 calories, 4 g fibre, source of folate and magnesium

Disease-fighting factor: Raspberries are rich in ellagic acid, an antioxidant that may help prevent cervical cancer. Promising studies in animals have led researchers to believe that raspberries may also help treat esophageal and colon cancer.

Did you know?

Raspberries are so perishable that only three per cent of Canada’s raspberry crop is sold fresh. The remaining berries are used to make jam, baked goods and other delicacies.

blueberry

7. Blueberry

• Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 41 calories, 1.5 g fibre, rich in antioxidants

• Disease-fighting factor: Blueberries rank No. 1 in antioxidant activity when compared to 60 other fresh fruits and vegetables. Blueberries may help lower the risk of developing age-related diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

• Did you know?

Blueberries freeze very well. Here’s how: Rinse, then let berries dry in a single layer on towels. Freeze in a single layer on rimmed baking sheets. Seal in freezer-safe containers for up to one year. Use them straight from the freezer in your morning cereal, blend them into a smoothie or mix into pancake or muffin batter. (You can also buy frozen blueberries year-round.)

figs2

8. Fig (dried)

• Nutritional value (2 dried figs): 42 calories, 1.5 g fibre, source of potassium, calcium and iron

• Disease-fighting factor: High in fibre, figs may help reduce the risk of heart disease.

• Did you know?

Puréed figs make an excellent substitute for fat (like butter or oil) in baked goods. Simply purée 1 cup (250 mL) of dried figs with 1/4 cup (50 mL) of water, then replace half of the fat called for in the recipe with an equal amount of the fig mixture.

cherry

9. Cherry

Nutritional value (1/2 cup/125 mL): 46 calories, 1.5 g fibre, rich in antioxidants

• Disease-fighting factor: Sour cherries contain more of the potent antioxidant anthocyanin than any other fruit. Anthocyanin may help reduce inflammation and ease the pain of arthritis and gout.

• Did you know? Sour cherries, commonly used in pie and jam, have more vitamin C than sweet cherries do, but much of it is lost when they are heated.

grapefruit

10. Grapefruit (pink)

• Nutritional value (1/2 grapefruit): 52 calories, 2 g fibre, source of vitamin A

• Disease-fighting factor: Pink grapefruit contains lycopene and flavonoids, which may help protect against some types of cancer. Grapefruit also boasts an ample supply of pectin, a soluble fibre that may help lower cholesterol levels.

• Did you know? Grapefruit can heighten the effect of certain drugs, including cholesterol-lowering statins. Check with your pharmacist to see if grapefruit may interfere with any of your medications.

grape

11. Grape

• Nutritional value (1/2 cup/ 125 mL): 53 calories, less than 1 g fibre, source of manganese

Disease-fighting factor: Grapes contain resveratrol, an antioxidant that may help prevent heart disease by reducing blood pressure levels and lowering the risk of blood clots. Resveratrol may also help stop the spread of breast, stomach and colon cancer cells.

• Did you know?

You can freeze red and green grapes and use them as colourful ice cubes in your favourite drinks. They add a special touch to sparkling water or Champagne.

mango

12. Mango

Nutritional value (1/2 medium): 54 calories, 1.5 g fibre, source of vitamins A and E

• Disease-fighting factor: Mangoes are high in the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, which may help protect vision and reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration (the leading cause of blindness in adults).

• Did you know?

Mangoes can be enjoyed ripe as a sweet, juicy dessert choice or unripe as a sour, crunchy addition to chutney and salads.

So enjoy your fruits  intake and make sure you take them with moderation.  Eating with moderation consists of making sure you balance your food out,  and don’t exclusively eat meat, vegetables, fruit, cheese cakes, Malteses or whatever. Too much of anything even  fruits or vegetables — is not eating with moderation.

Want to learn more…

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Contact Vinh direct:

vinh@artshine.com.au , +61 410 636 138

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About The Author

I am a Business LifeStyle coach who specialises in working with artists, designers, crafters and all creative professionals. Myself and my partner Stuart Horrex are here to help you to achieve your Life & business goal and dreams. We have had over 20 years experience in finance, retail,furniture,food,wine fashion,crafts and hospitality.